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How do I create an in-text citation for a film?

The in-text citation for a film should key to a works-cited-list entry. If you list a film under its title, you must refer to the title in your writing or cite it parenthetically: Point of No Return, a remake of Nikita, deviates from the original French movie in several ways. Luc Besson (Nikita) and John Badham (Point) approach the figure . . .

Published 20 February 2018

Should my student provide both English and Chinese versions of a works-cited-list entry when citing a work in Chinese?

In its publications, the MLA prefers to provide works-cited-list entries in the original script, along with a translation and sometimes a transliteration, for works not written in roman characters (see our previous post). In a teaching context, however, it is fine to allow students to provide works-cited-list entries in English only.

Published 28 February 2018

How do I punctuate quoted dialogue from a novel?

How you punctuate quoted dialogue from a novel will depend on what you are quoting and how you are quoting it. See the three most common considerations below. Quoting Dialogue and Text If you are incorporating a quotation featuring both exposition and a character’s speech into your text, use double quotation marks around the quotation and single quotation marks . . .

Published 14 December 2017

If an online source becomes defunct before I turn in or publish my paper, what do I do?

The primary goal of documentation is not to ensure perpetual access to a source but to verify the publication facts of the version you consulted. Thus it is acceptable to cite the original version with the defunct URL: Bluestone, Gabrielle. “Three Jailed in Myanmar for Posting Image of a Buddha Wearing Headphones.” Gawker, 19 Mar. 2015,  . . .

Published 21 November 2017

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