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How do I cite an online lesson?

To cite an online lesson, follow the MLA template of core elements. List the name of the instructor in the “Author” slot, the title of the lesson or a description of it, the course title, the sponsor of the course, the start and end dates of the course, and a URL: Venard, Lourdes. Lesson on nominalizations, . . .

Published 8 November 2018

If I repeatedly use a quotation from the same source, do I need to use quotation marks each time?

You should generally use quotation marks if you repeat a quotation from the same source, but you may omit quotation marks when referring back to a concept or method (e.g., distant reading) mentioned in the source: Moretti takes issue with this tendency to regard literature at any level as “a world” complete and classifiable rather than . . .

Published 2 November 2018

If more than one person is interviewed in the same interview, do I create separate entries for each person or treat them as coauthors in a single entry?

One interview is one work, no matter how many people are being interviewed or how many people are conducting the interview, so you should create only one entry. An example: Washington, Denzel, and Michael B. Jordan. “Passing the Torch: Denzel Washington and Michael B. Jordan.” Interview conducted by Philip Galanes. The New York Times, 19 Apr. . . .

Published 17 October 2018

I am writing a paper in English. I have used the French edition of a book originally published in Dutch. Do I need to include both the French and Dutch editions in my works-cited list?

List only the version you are using—in this case, the French edition. You do not need to indicate in your entry the language in which the work was originally published or to provide original publication details, but if you wish to do so, you may include the information in the optional-element slot at the end: . . .

Published 9 October 2018

How do I cite search results as evidence?

Search results are not a work, so no works-cited-list entry is needed. If you are referring to the results as evidence, you can simply name the database in your prose, as in the following example: At first—to judge from the 190-odd results for the phrase in a JSTOR search at the time of writing—invocations of distant reading . . .

Published 27 September 2018

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