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How do I cite a magazine cover in my works-cited list and in my essay?

To cite the cover of a magazine, you can generally create a works-cited-list entry for the issue of the magazine and then key your in-text reference to the first element of the entry: 

The most recent issue of The Nation features on its cover an image of a donkey with the top of the Capitol building on its back.
Work Cited
The Nation. 17-24 Dec. 2018, www.thenation.com/issue/december-17-24-2018-issue/.

If you discuss a cover image in detail and wish to credit the artist, you could provide the artist’s full name at first mention in your prose or the artist’s last name in parentheses and list the entry under the artist’s name. 

Published 19 April 2019

Should the initial article in periodical titles be retained in both prose and works-cited-list entries?

Yes. The styling of titles should be consistent in your prose and in your works-cited list. Since, as the MLA Handbook notes, “[t]itles are given in the entry in full exactly as they are found in the source” (25), if the title of a periodical starts with an article, retain the article when you provide the title in your works-cited-list entry and in your prose, as shown in the following example: 

In an article in The New York Times on political analysts published shortly after the 2012 presidential election, Eric Pfanner mentions two pollsters, Simon Jackman and Drew Linzer,

Published 17 April 2019

How do I cite the works-cited quick guide from The MLA Style Center?

Cite the works-cited quick guide from The MLA Style Center by following the MLA format template described in the guide. If you are referring to the guide as a whole, you might cite it as follows: 

“Works Cited: A Quick Guide.” The MLA Style Center, Modern Language Association of America, 2018, style.mla.org/works-cited-a-quick-guide/.

If you are citing individual Web pages from the guide, create a works-cited-list entry for each page that you cite. Since each page has the same title, you might use the page header as the title of the source, followed by the title of the Web site as the title of the container.

Published 11 April 2019

How do I cite a handbook or adventure module for a tabletop role-playing game such as Dungeons and Dragons?

If you are citing a published handbook or adventure module for a tabletop role-playing game such as Dungeons and Dragons, treat the work as you would any other book in MLA style and follow the MLA format template. Some published handbooks or adventures may be produced by many people playing various roles, so if your discussion of such a work does not focus on an individual’s contribution to the volume, begin the entry with the title of the work.

Player’s Handbook. Wizards of the Coast, 2014.
Storm King’s Thunder. Wizards of the Coast,

Published 5 April 2019

Is it acceptable to list both a DOI and a URL in the same works-cited-list entry if one leads to a chapter and the other to the book as a whole?

No. If you are citing a chapter of a book from a novel or monograph, create an entry for the book as a whole and list the book’s URL or DOI in the “Location” slot, since in MLA style, chapters from these types of works are not cited individually: 

Gerrard, Christine. Aaron Hill: The Muses’ Projector, 1685-1750. Oxford UP, Jan. 2010, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183884.001.0001.

If you are citing a chapter from an anthology, create an entry for the chapter and list the chapter URL or DOI:

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Paradise Lost, the Bible, and Biblical Epic.” The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England,

Published 3 April 2019

How should I cite an article from a journal that uses article numbers and starts pagination anew for each article?

Omit the article number and page numbers, as shown in the example below, because the name of the author and the title of the journal are sufficient to lead your reader to the article. 

Boyd, James W., and Tetsuya Nishimura. “Shinto Perspectives in Miyazaki’s Anime Film Spirited Away.” Journal of Religion and Film, vol. 8, no. 3, Oct. 2004. Digital Commons@UNO, digitalcommons
.unomaha.edu/jrf/vol8/iss3/.

 
 
 

Published 27 March 2019

How do I cite a phrase from a poem quoted in the published version of a speech?

To cite a poem quoted in the published version of a speech, create a works-cited-list entry for the speech since it is your source. You can provide relevant details about the poem being quoted in your prose or in a note.
For example, in a speech about the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Kennedy quoted Aeschylus. If you were quoting Kennedy’s speech, you might write the following and cite the speech:

Kennedy urged listeners to reject physical destruction and to seek mutual understanding, quoting Aeschylus, who wrote, “In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until,

Published 18 March 2019

How do I cite a photo or other image reproduced in a Web site article?

When citing an image reproduced in an article on a Web site, you can generally refer to it in your text and then key the reference to a works-cited-list entry for the article. In the example below, the image, reproduced in an article on a Web site, is described in prose, and the name of the article’s author is provided in a parenthetical citation that keys to the works-cited-list entry:

A recent article summarizing a study of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa shows a scan of the original Mona Lisa so that readers can judge for themselves whether or not the woman in the painting is smiling (Daley).

Published 14 March 2019

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