You are viewing all posts tagged

How do I cite the question-and-answer portion of a conference session?

Use your discussion of the event to refer to the question-and-answer portion:

At the ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival in January 2018, I had the opportunity to ask Tom Stoppard a question about his play The Real Thing during the question-and-answer portion of his panel discussion with Sanjna Kapoor (Kapoor and Stoppard).

To create a works-cited-list entry for the event, give the session participants in the “Author” slot, the title or description of the session in the “Title of source” slot, the conference name as the title of the container, and the date and location of the session:

Kapoor, Sanjna, . . .

Published 23 May 2019

How do I cite lyrics I heard from a song in a musical?

To cite lyrics you heard from a song in a musical, follow the MLA format template. Note that how you cite the lyrics will depend on where you heard them and the information provided by the source.
Live Performance
Let’s say you’re citing lyrics from a song in the musical Cabaret, which you saw in person. In the “Author” slot, list the name of the person who wrote the lyrics. If the lyricist did not also write the music, add the label “lyricist” for clarity. Then list the name of the song as the title of the source and the name of the musical as the title of the container.

Published 21 November 2018

How do I cite a webinar?

To cite the live version of a webinar you attended, follow the MLA format template. List the name of the presenter as the author, the title of the webinar, the organization responsible for the webinar, and the date. For clarity, you may add “Webinar” in the optional-element slot at the end of the entry:

Gibson, Angela. MLA Style 101. Modern Language Association, 22 Aug. 2017. Webinar.

To cite the recording of the webinar, list the date that the recording was posted and the URL:

Gibson, Angela. MLA Style 101. Modern Language Association, 30 Aug. 2017, outreach.mla.org/mla-style.

 
  . . .

Published 15 January 2018

How do I treat the title of a work uploaded to a video sharing site?

In general, copy the title of the work exactly as it appears on the site. For example, YouTube contains a video that an uploader has labeled “Night of the Comet Widescreen Full Movie 1984.” In your works-cited-list entry, you would therefore provide the title of the work given by the uploader because you’re citing that version of the work, not the original version of the movie, Night of the Comet:

Night of the Comet Widescreen Full Movie 1984YouTube, uploaded by Jen Dobbins, 20 Sept. 2013, www.youtube.com/watch?v=me4pOQOt20s&t=10s.

Published 4 January 2018

How do I cite a special feature from a DVD?

To cite a special feature from a DVD, follow the MLA format template. List the title of the feature as the “Title of source.” Then provide the name of the DVD as the “Title of container,” followed by the publication details. If necessary for clarity, list the format in the optional-element slot at the end of the entry:

“NYC Press Conference.” Led Zeppelin, produced by Jimmy Page and Dick Carruthers, disc 2, Atlantic Recording / Warner Music Group, 2003. DVD.

 If the special feature appears on a separate disc in a DVD set, treat the disc as an independent work contained in the collection:

“Behind the Scenes.” Bonus Materials. . . .

Published 1 March 2018

Which element on the MLA template applies to the uploader of an online work, like a video?

The name of the person or organization responsible for uploading the video should be listed in the “Other contributors” slot regardless of whether the uploader appears to be the author—that is, the same person or organization that created the video. There is often no way to know—although some persons and organizations obtain verification from sites such as YouTube and Twitter so that a distinguishing mark indicates that the video was indeed uploaded by the person or organization.
However, not everyone can or does take this step, so the omission of verification does not mean that the video was uploaded by someone else.

Published 28 November 2017

How do I document a movie or video republished on a Web site?

To document a movie or video republished on a Web site, provide the publication details for the movie in container 1 and the publication details for the Web site in container 2:

Richardson, Tony, director. Sanctuary. Screenplay by James Poe, performances by Lee Remick and Yves Montand, Twentieth Century Fox, 1961. YouTube, uploaded by LostCinemaChannel, 17 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMnzFM_Sq8s.

Published 17 October 2017

How do I cite an online video?

Begin the entry as you would any other: consult the MLA format template. List the title of the video in the “Title of source” slot and the title of the Web site where you watched the video in the “Title of container” slot.
Rubier, Jeremy, director. Gui Martinez: A Short Film and Photo Essay. Vimeo, uploaded by Poweredby.tokyo, May 2017, vimeo.com/channels/staffpicks/216976160.
Keep in mind that some information may not be available, and other information may be included. In the example below, the video has no author, director, or producer, so work with what you have:
Slip Slip Knit (SSK).

Published 28 September 2017

Get MLA Style News from The Source

Be the first to read new posts and updates about MLA style.

The Source Sign-up - Style Center Footer