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How do I quote bulleted or numbered points from a source?

If you need to quote from a bulleted or numbered list, you can reproduce the list in your essay, as in the example below:

Parvini organizes the material into four groups:

Early modern Christian beliefs inherited from the medieval period, indeed the very period that Shakespeare is writing about in the history plays
The structure of feudal and semifeudal society
Emergent humanist ideas about history and politics imported from Renaissance Italy, especially those of Niccolò Machiavelli
The key events of the Wars of the Roses and the corresponding key plot points of Shakespeare’s two tetralogies. (95)

Work Cited
Parvini, Neema. “Historicism ‘By Stealth’: History,

Published 1 October 2018

How do you cite speech bubbles from a graphic narrative?

Cite each speech bubble individually. Do not use slashes to indicate quotations from separate speech bubbles. Use ellipses only to omit text from a single speech bubble.

In Fun Home the narrator recalls episodes in her parents’ troubled marriage. In one scene Alison and her brothers are shown sitting at the top of a staircase, listening to their parents argue below. They hear their mother say, “I’m warning you. You can’t keep doing this.” Their father retorts, “I can do whatever I want” (68), a declaration that is punctuated by a loud crash. “What was that?” asks Alison’s younger brother.

Published 5 September 2018

How do I cite more than one sonnet from a sequence of sonnets?

As always, when you are citing a work contained in a larger work, you must identify the particular work you are citing. Thus, if you are citing more than one sonnet from a sequence of sonnets, include the word sonnet and the sonnet’s number in your prose or parenthetically and create one works-cited-list entry for the entire collection of sonnets. 

In sonnet 137 William Shakespeare asks Love, “[W]hat dost thou to mine eyes, / That they behold and see not what they see?” (lines 1–2), and he speaks of a “perjur’d eye” in sonnet 152 (line 13).

Published 30 August 2018

How do I cite a paraphrase and a quotation that occur in the same sentence?

If you need to cite a paraphrase and a quotation that occur in the same sentence, you may provide the page numbers at the end of the sentence:

Andrew Davis asserts that the strategies undertaken by the institution were well formulated but ultimately unsuccessful because the institution failed to persuade employees that the “preemptive” efforts were in their best interest (165; see 160-68).

You could also provide the page number for the quotation in parentheses and then insert an endnote about the paraphrase:

Andrew Davis asserts that the strategies undertaken by the institution were well formulated but ultimately unsuccessful because the institution failed to persuade employees that the “preemptive”

Published 26 July 2018

When a source consists of only one page, such as a newspaper article, should I give the page number in my in-text citation?

No. If a work is only one page, as in the example below, you should not include a page number in your in-text citation.

A lengthier article in New York City’s The World went even further, echoing Edwards’s suggestion of criminality in declaring Wilde’s novel “the sensation of the day in certain circles of society”—those circles “which call for constant police supervision” (Review).
Work Cited
Review of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. The World, 17 July 1890, p. 5.

Note
The example is from Thomas Vranken’s introduction to “Oscar Wilde’s Book,” by E. J.

Published 3 July 2018

How do I cite dialogue spoken by a character in a video game?

To cite dialogue spoken by a character in a video game, transcribe the words you hear or copy the quote from the text box displaying it and enclose the words in double quotation marks. Since there are no markers indicating where in the video the dialogue appears, it can be helpful to give a general sense of where the dialogue appears:  

At the start of Snake Pass, Doodle wakes Noodle up and tells him what’s happened: “The gate . . . the gate is broken! If we don’t fix it, we’ll be stuck here forever!” 
Work Cited
Snake Pass.

Published 26 June 2018

How do I cite two versions of a poem from the same anthology?

As explained in a previous post, to distinguish between works with the same author and title, you need to include additional information in your parenthetical citation—usually the first unique piece of information in your works-cited-list entry. This principle applies if you are citing two versions of a poem from the same anthology.
For example, the anthology Poetry: An Introduction includes two versions of Emily Dickinson’s poem “Safe in their Alabaster Chambers—,” a version published in 1859 and an unpublished version from 1861 that Dickinson sent to Thomas W. Higginson. Your works-cited-list entries would look as follows:

Dickinson, Emily. “Safe in their Alabaster Chambers—.”

Published 7 June 2018

How do I distinguish between different dictionary entries for the same term in my in-text citation?

To distinguish between different dictionary entries for the same term, follow the principle in our previous post on distinguishing between works with the same title: provide additional details in your parenthetical citation, usually the first unique piece of information in your works-cited-list entries.
For example, in the following works-cited-list entries for emoticon, the information in the “Title of source” slot—the headword—is identical:  

“Emoticon, N.” Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., Merriam-Webster, 2003, p. 408.
“Emoticon, N.” Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford UP, 2018, www.oed.com/view/Entry/249618?redirectedFrom=emoticon#eid.

To distinguish between these entries in your parenthetical citation,

Published 30 May 2018

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