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How do I refer to works with identical titles?

It’s not uncommon for a writer to discuss two or more works with the same title. For example, a writer may compare different editions or translations of the same work or discuss a written work and its film adaptation with the same title. When identical titles are styled identically—such as the italic titles of a . . .

Published 29 September 2017

Do I introduce an author’s full name and the full title of a work in each chapter of a book or dissertation?

It depends on the focus of your work. In a dissertation on a single author or title—say, Gabriel Marcel’s Being and Having: An Existentialist Diary—it would be overkill to introduce the author and full title of the work anew in each chapter. References to the author’s last name and a shortened title are sufficient. But . . .

Published 12 September 2017

If I’m citing an entire play reprinted in an anthology, does it appear in italics?

Yes. As the MLA Handbook explains, the title of an independent work (that is, a work that usually stands alone, such as a play, novel, or artwork) is styled in italics, even when the work is contained in another independent work (27): Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. The Riverside Shakespeare, edited by G. Blakemore Evans et al., . . .

Published 3 May 2017

When citing a work whose title ends in a question mark or exclamation point, should I also include a period?

The MLA template of core elements calls for a period after the title of a source, but if the title of a source ends in a question mark or exclamation point, do not include a period. Question marks or exclamation points, as stronger marks, always supersede a period: Albee, Edward. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? . . .

Published 11 October 2016

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