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If an untitled poem is known by its first line, how do I style that line in my works-cited-list entry?

The MLA Handbook explains that when you refer to an untitled poem known by its first line, you should style the line the way it is shown in the source (68). This guideline applies both to the text and the works-cited list: Dickinson’s poem “I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—” contrasts the everyday and the momentous. Work Cited Dickinson, . . .

Published 19 January 2018

In my works-cited-list entry, how do I give the title of a foreign work that is provided on the title page in both English and the original language?

When referring to a work in a bilingual volume in which titles appear in both languages, give both titles and interpolate a slash between them. The slash has a space on each side when the title on either side contains a space: Leopardi, Giacomo. “Storia del genere umano / History of the Human Race.” Operette . . .

Published 11 December 2017

How do I cite an article in a newsletter that has no title?

Following the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook, provide a description of the work if it is untitled. Do not italicize the description or enclose it in quotation marks (28–29): Schimpf, K. D. “Quarterly Earnings Prompt Stock Split.” Monthly newsletter of the Phillips Petroleum Company, Aug. 2008, www.philpet.com/smartin/quarterly-split/. Kirkland, Edward. “Sauber, Fisher Duel for Senior . . .

Published 1 December 2017

If a source contains more than one work with an introduction to each labeled “Introduction,” how should I refer to the introductions in my writing and in my works-cited list?

If you need to differentiate among several introductions in a source because each is labeled “Introduction,” you can either make clear in your writing which introduction you are referring to or use a description in a parenthetical citation: In his introduction to Antigone, Bernard Knox remarks that to Victorian readers, “the subject matter of the play seemed academic” (35). . . .

Published 30 November 2017

How do I refer to works with identical titles?

It’s not uncommon for a writer to discuss two or more works with the same title. For example, a writer may compare different editions or translations of the same work or discuss a written work and its film adaptation with the same title. When identical titles are styled identically—such as the italic titles of a . . .

Published 29 September 2017

Do I introduce an author’s full name and the full title of a work in each chapter of a book or dissertation?

It depends on the focus of your work. In a dissertation on a single author or title—say, Gabriel Marcel’s Being and Having: An Existentialist Diary—it would be overkill to introduce the author and full title of the work anew in each chapter. References to the author’s last name and a shortened title are sufficient. But . . .

Published 12 September 2017

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