If I cite a work that has no page numbers and I give the author’s name at the beginning of my sentence, how does the reader know where the author’s idea ends, since there is no parenthetical citation?

As the MLA Handbook notes, when you borrow an idea from a source, “it is important to signal at the end . . . that you are switching to another source or to your own ideas” (126). A parenthetical citation is just one way to indicate this switch. You may also use prose, as in the following example:

Original:

Terry Eagleton argues that The Communist Manifesto is more relevant today than it was in 1848, when it was published. The language of class warfare permeates twenty-first-century discourse.

Revised:

Terry Eagleton argues that The Communist Manifesto is more relevant today than it was in 1848, when it was published. I think the way the language of class warfare permeates twenty-first-century discourse proves his point.

Work Cited

MLA Handbook. 8th ed., Modern Language Association of America, 2016.

Published 2 October 2018

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