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Should I create an entry for an e-mail conversation?

How you cite e-mail messages depends on how you are using them in your work. 
If you refer generally to a series of e-mail exchanges that you had with the same person over several months or if you repeatedly discuss or quote from such an exchange, you could refer to the e-mail messages in your prose or in an endnote. But if you quote directly from a single message that you received or paraphrase its contents, it may be clearer and more economical to create a works-cited-list entry for the message.
 
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Published 25 October 2018

How do I quote bulleted or numbered points from a source?

If you need to quote from a bulleted or numbered list, you can reproduce the list in your essay, as in the example below:

Parvini organizes the material into four groups:

Early modern Christian beliefs inherited from the medieval period, indeed the very period that Shakespeare is writing about in the history plays
The structure of feudal and semifeudal society
Emergent humanist ideas about history and politics imported from Renaissance Italy, especially those of Niccolò Machiavelli
The key events of the Wars of the Roses and the corresponding key plot points of Shakespeare’s two tetralogies. (95)

Work Cited
Parvini, Neema. “Historicism ‘By Stealth’: History, . . .

Published 1 October 2018

How do I cite a paraphrase and a quotation that occur in the same sentence?

If you need to cite a paraphrase and a quotation that occur in the same sentence, you may provide the page numbers at the end of the sentence:

Andrew Davis asserts that the strategies undertaken by the institution were well formulated but ultimately unsuccessful because the institution failed to persuade employees that the “preemptive” efforts were in their best interest (165; see 160-68).

You could also provide the page number for the quotation in parentheses and then insert an endnote about the paraphrase:

Andrew Davis asserts that the strategies undertaken by the institution were well formulated but ultimately unsuccessful because the institution failed to persuade employees that the “preemptive” . . .

Published 26 July 2018

How do I cite dialogue spoken by a character in a video game?

To cite dialogue spoken by a character in a video game, transcribe the words you hear or copy the quote from the text box displaying it and enclose the words in double quotation marks. Since there are no markers indicating where in the video the dialogue appears, it can be helpful to give a general sense of where the dialogue appears:  

At the start of Snake Pass, Doodle wakes Noodle up and tells him what’s happened: “The gate . . . the gate is broken! If we don’t fix it, we’ll be stuck here forever!” 
Work Cited
Snake Pass.

Published 26 June 2018

When should I capitalize the first letter of the first word of a quotation?

Whether to capitalize or lowercase the first letter of the first word of a quotation depends on how the quotation is integrated into your prose and what appears in the original.
After a Verb of Saying
Capitalize the first letter if the quotation appears after a verb of saying, regardless of the case used in the source–but flag any alterations you make.
A quotation that follows a verb of saying (e.g., writes, says, states, exclaims) and is run in to your text is introduced with a comma and begins with a capital letter.

Published 22 May 2018

How do I format and document epigraphs in MLA style?

Epigraphs establish tone, highlight allusions, provide commentary, and mark transitions between parts of a work. Primarily ornamental, they are not discussed subsequently in the text. 
Design
Although publishers vary in how they style epigraphs, one commonality is that epigraphs are set apart from the main text by being placed at the start of a book, chapter, essay, or other section of a work. They usually do not appear in quotation marks. Sometimes, they are italicized or set in a font different from that used in the text. For example, in the MLA book series Approaches to Teaching, epigraphs appear thus:*

Whereas in the journal PMLA, . . .

Published 7 May 2018

If I need to fit a quotation syntactically into a sentence, can I use empty brackets to indicate that I have removed letters from a verb?

No. In MLA style, brackets are generally only used to add material or show visible alterations, not to indicate omissions.1 So when attempting to fit a quotation syntactically into a sentence, you must find a different solution.
Let’s say, for example, you want to quote the opening sentence of David Lodge’s novel Changing Places:

High, high above the North Pole, on the first day of 1969, two professors of English Literature approached each other at a combined velocity of 1200 miles per hour. (7) 

If the syntax of your sentence demands that you place the quotation in the present tense, . . .

Published 27 April 2018

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