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If I am writing a paper in a foreign language and my works-cited list contains works in more than one language, should labels such as “edited by” be given in the foreign language or in English? Also, should the works-cited-list entry be punctuated according to the rules of the foreign language?

The language that you use to describe elements in your works-cited list should be the language that your paper is written in, which should also determine the punctuation used.   In other words, if your paper is in Spanish but you cite a work published in English in the works-cited list, use “editado por” instead of . . .

Published 17 May 2018

In a works-cited-list entry, if a URL ends with a question mark, should a period follow?

If the last element of a works-cited-list entry is a URL ending in a question mark, a period should follow the URL: Krugman, Paul. “Bubble, Bubble, Fraud and Trouble.” The New York Times, 29 Jan. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/01/29/opinion/bitcoin-bubble-fraud.html?. Note, however, that the rule differs for the title of a work ending in a question mark or exclamation . . .

Published 11 May 2018

How do I format and document epigraphs in MLA style?

Epigraphs establish tone, highlight allusions, provide commentary, and mark transitions between parts of a work. Primarily ornamental, they are not discussed subsequently in the text.  Design Although publishers vary in how they style epigraphs, one commonality is that epigraphs are set apart from the main text by being placed at the start of a book, . . .

Published 7 May 2018

How do I handle prefixes such as pre- and post- in MLA style?

MLA style, which follows Merriam-Webster, does not use hyphens after most prefixes. We would write, for example, antiestablishment, coauthor, nonlinear, and prealgebra. A hyphen is needed, however, before a capital letter (pre-Renaissance), when the term would be hard to recognize otherwise (anti-intellectual), and to avoid misreading (the hyphen in re-cover, meaning “cover again,” distinguishes the term from recover, meaning “recuperate”).

Published 18 January 2018

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