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How do I cite a critical essay published in the same volume as a literary text–for example, an essay in a Norton Critical Edition?

To cite a critical essay published in the same volume as a literary work, follow the MLA format template. List the author of the essay, followed by the title. Then list the name of the volume from which you accessed the essay, followed by the the volume’s publication details. In the optional-element slot at the end of the entry, you may provide original publication details if the volume supplies them, but the information is not required:

Stone, Harry. “Fairy Tales and Ogres: Dickens’ Imagination and David Copperfield.” David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens, edited by Jerome H.

Published 9 May 2019

How do I cite a handbook or adventure module for a tabletop role-playing game such as Dungeons and Dragons?

If you are citing a published handbook or adventure module for a tabletop role-playing game such as Dungeons and Dragons, treat the work as you would any other book in MLA style and follow the MLA format template. Some published handbooks or adventures may be produced by many people playing various roles, so if your discussion of such a work does not focus on an individual’s contribution to the volume, begin the entry with the title of the work.

Player’s Handbook. Wizards of the Coast, 2014.
Storm King’s Thunder. Wizards of the Coast, . . .

Published 5 April 2019

Is it acceptable to list both a DOI and a URL in the same works-cited-list entry if one leads to a chapter and the other to the book as a whole?

No. If you are citing a chapter of a book from a novel or monograph, create an entry for the book as a whole and list the book’s URL or DOI in the “Location” slot, since in MLA style, chapters from these types of works are not cited individually: 

Gerrard, Christine. Aaron Hill: The Muses’ Projector, 1685-1750. Oxford UP, Jan. 2010, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183884.001.0001.

If you are citing a chapter from an anthology, create an entry for the chapter and list the chapter URL or DOI:

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Paradise Lost, the Bible, and Biblical Epic.” The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, . . .

Published 3 April 2019

How do I indicate that the editor of a work is also its translator in my works-cited-list entry?

When an individual is both the editor and translator of a work, put the name of the editor-translator in the “Author” slot, followed by the designation editor and translator:

Kepner, Susan Fulop, editor and translator. The Lioness in Bloom: Modern Thai Fiction about Women. U of California P, 1996.

If the work has an author in addition to an editor-translator, list the author in the “Author” slot and the editor-translator in the “Other contributors” slot:

Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and Its Discontents. Edited and translated by James Strachey, W. W. Norton, 2005. 

If your focus is on the contribution of the editor-translator, . . .

Published 7 January 2019

If Publishing is part of a publisher’s name on the title page of my source, should I include that word as part of the publisher’s name in my works-cited-list entry?

The MLA Handbook recommends omitting business words like Company, Corporation, and Incorporated (1.6.3) because the publisher can generally be identified without them. In our editorial practice, we retain Publishing if it is part of the publisher’s name on the title page of the source because it may be a helpful descriptive term. In the handbook, two sample works-cited-list entries list “Ablex Publishing” as the publisher (114). If you don’t find the term useful, you may omit it, but whatever you decide, be consistent.
Work Cited
MLA Handbook, . . .

Published 12 December 2018

If a book title within an essay title is not italicized in the source, should I italicize it in my works-cited-list entry?

Yes. A title within a title should be styled according to the guidelines in section 1.2.4 of the MLA Handbook, regardless of how a title within a title is styled in the source.
For example, the title of an essay about Gone with the Wind is styled in EBSCOHost as follows:

Since Gone with the Wind is the title of a novel, if you were to include this essay in your works-cited list, you would set it in italics instead of enclosing it in quotation marks:

Adams, Amanda. “‘Painfully Southern’: Gone with the Wind, . . .

Published 3 October 2018

If I want to include a DOI for a book chapter in my works-cited-list entry, where should I insert it?

If you are citing a chapter of a book from a novel or monograph, create an entry for the book as a whole and list the book’s DOI in the “Location” slot, since in MLA style, chapters from these types of works are not cited individually. 
If you wish to include a DOI for a chapter in an anthology, include it in the “Location” slot:

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Paradise Lost, the Bible, and Biblical Epic.” The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, c.1530-1700, edited by Kevin Killeen et al., . . .

Published 23 August 2018

If I cite from a book that has an introduction, but I do not cite the introduction, should I include the introduction’s author in my works-cited-list entry?

Authors of introductions, prefaces, afterwords, and the like—collectively called front and back matter—are not usually essential to identifying a work and can be omitted from works-cited-list entries. If you do include the author of an introduction, place the author’s name in the “Other contributors” slot:

Gogol, Nikolai. Dead Souls: A Novel. Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volkhonsky, introduction by Pevear, Vintage Books, 1996.

You might include the author of an introduction or related material in your entry if the information would be especially useful for readers—for example, if the name of the author indicates that the edition being cited is reliable, . . .

Published 30 January 2018

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