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How do I cite an unpublished student paper?

A works-cited-list entry for an unpublished student paper should include the author, title of the paper (in quotation marks), and date. The name of the course, the institution for which the paper was prepared, and the type of work can be provided as optional information at the end of the entry:

Leland, Dina. “Designing Web Sites with Preschool Learners in Mind: Two Approaches Compared.” 4 Sept. 2017. User Experience 101, Dunham College, student paper.

In its publications, it is MLA policy to obtain permission from students before quoting from work they produced for class. Note that this does not extend to MA or PhD theses, . . .

Published 8 February 2019

How do I cite a director’s unpublished notes about a play?

Cite unpublished director’s notes by following the MLA format template. List the director’s name in the “Author” slot and provide a description in place of a title. Provide the date the notes were written if available. In the optional-element slot at the end of the entry, indicate the format:

Carlsson, Knut. Notes on directing Taming of the Shrew. 1956. Unpublished typescript.

  . . .

Published 11 October 2018

How do I cite an unpublished translation?

Cite an unpublished translation by following the MLA format template. List the author of the work, the title of the translation in quotation marks (since it is an unpublished work), and the name of the translator. In the optional-element slot at the end of the entry, indicate the format:

Wallace, David Foster. “Ludus infinitus.” Translated by Publius Vergilius Maro. Typescript.

When you refer to the translation in your prose, indicate the original title:

In what follows, I provide a thorough analysis of “Ludus infinitus,” the Latin translation of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.  . . .

Published 12 March 2018

When documenting unpublished letters, should the descriptions of the letters that are used in place of a title appear in quotation marks or italics? If I am citing more than one letter written by the same person, how should I distinguish the letters in my in-text citation?

For unpublished letters, provide a generic description in place of the title (see pp. 28–29 of the MLA Handbook); do not enclose the description in quotation marks or italicize it. For example:
Benton, Thomas Hart. Letter to Charles Fremont. 22 June 1847. John Charles Fremont Papers, Southwest Museum Library, Los Angeles. Manuscript.
---. Letter to Charles Fremont. 23 June 1847. John Charles Fremont Papers, Southwest Museum Library, Los Angeles. Manuscript.
In your in-text citation, distinguish letters written to the same recipient, as in the example above, with the first unique item of information—usually, the date:
(Letter [22 June])
(Letter [23 June])
If your works-cited list includes letters to two different recipients, . . .

Published 7 July 2016

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